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New European Regulations for Pet Travel


Pet Passports for European Union (EU) Countries.

NEW EUROPEAN REGULATIONS FOR THE MOVEMENT OF PETS WITHIN THE EUROPEAN UNION (EU) AND FROM THIRD COUNTRIES

MOVEMENT OF PETS BETWEEN EU COUNTRIES

Cats, dogs and ferrets can travel freely between most EU countries without documentation if they have what is called the EU PET PASSPORT that is issued by veterinarians within the EU. The exceptions are entry into the United Kingdom, Norway, Sweden and Malta which have additional requirements.

ENTERING THE EU WITH A PET FROM RABIES FREE COUNTRIES or COUNTRIES WITH A LOW INCIDENCE OF RABIES

Cats, dogs and ferrets can enter most EU countries from rabies free countries or countries with a low incidence of rabies once they have been microchipped with the ISO 15 digit microchip, vaccinated for rabies and are accompanied by the EU form 998 veterinary health certificate for the EU country they are traveling to. The exceptions are entry into the UK (England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland), Norway, Sweden and Malta which have additional requirements until January 1, 2012.

ENTERING THE EU WITH A PET FROM COUNTRIES WITH A HIGH INCIDENCE OF RABIES

Cats, dogs and ferrets can enter most EU countries from countries with a high incidence of rabies once they have been micro chipped with the ISO 15 digit microchip, vaccinated for rabies and are accompanied by the EU form 998 veterinary health certificate for the EU country they are traveling to. However, in addition, your pet must have a blood titer test in advance to avoid quarantine. The number of months in advance the Blood Titer Test must be done varies by country.

NEW RULES

The UK, Sweden and Malta will no longer require the Blood Titer Test when the pet is coming from a rabies free country or a country with a low incidence of rabies. In addition, the requirement for a certificate of treatment for ticks will no longer be required.

However, under the new regulations, pets must be transported with or within 5 days of their owner or their owner's representative to be eligible to travel under the Pet Travel Scheme. If your pet is being transported unaccompanied or you buy a puppy from another country and import it to the EU, then your pet must travel under the Balai Directive (commercially) and different rules apply. Find more details by finding the regulations for the EU country you are looking to visit on our pet passport page.

Legislation regarding puppies and kittens which are too young to be vaccinated for rabies and are under 3 months old and unvaccinated vary depending on the EU country. Few EU countries will allow unvaccinated animals to enter. (Austria, Bulgaria (from other EU countries), Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland (from other EU countires only), Croatia (from other EU countries only), Lithuania, Luxembourg (with owners from other EU countries only), Romania (from other EU countires only), Slovenia (from other EU countries only), Slovakia (from other EU countries only), and Switzerland.

Failure to comply with these regulations will not only mean that the pet is refused entry but that the relevant authority in consultation with an authorized vet can decide to:
   a) return the pet home;    b) place the pet in quarantine at the expense of the owner or natural person responsible for pet; or    c) as a last resort, without financial compensation, put the pet down where the return trip home or quarantine cannot be envisaged.

Regulations for birds vary by country. Rabbits, rodents and reptiles can be imported, but require quarantine when entering the UK. Owners are advised to contact the relevant authorities for further information regarding such conditions and requirements.

Pet Travel New European Regulations